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think so, but yeah, after a year or less after columbine, "the new york times" asked me to do a reported piece on the dash comac in denver and iceboat spent four days doing that and i was so thrilled to do something so lighthearted, nothing violent here, just people having fun and i said at that time, i am never doing another story on murder as long as i live. it was a huge emotional relief. but then i kept coming back. almost done with "columbine." my editors talk to me about perhaps a paperback afterward or something and i'm still talking to you. i have a u.k. tour in a week and, but i think i'm just about done. i would like to be done. i felt a huge relief after i turned in the final pages but i didn't even notice right away, within the next month friends started asking me you know, what is going on? you seem happier. are you dating someone? really, is there something going on? no, i turned up look in. it was finally off my chest. it was for better or worse after i turned bad in. i got in trouble for doing so much but i wanted to get this right. once i sent those things off, or better
about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see any reason why someone should be able to purchase military style or body armor or weapons. only the police and the military should have that. >> let's start off. you've been giving me a holler on twitter about this. you are a big gun fan. explain to me why bob costas is wrong? >> it boils down to the ability to protect yourself, piers. when you look at what is what happening in syria with the threat of chemical weapons. the only reason they're not going to use it is because someb
the northeast will look a lot like that, especially interior sections, pennsylvania, upstate new york and even portions of new england. later on tonight we'll quickly see the conditions deteriorating across the northeast. this storm system is very widespread. it is a large storm and areas across the south that aren't really dealing with any precipitation across places in alabama we're still dealing with strong winds from this storm. gusts easily over 40 miles per hour. we have wind advisories across the florida panhandle, alabama, georgia, portions of the carolinas and kentucky and state of tennessee. we're seeing a lot of widespread winds even though the storm system is not producing precipitation in your area. another big concern for the storm we're looking at a risk for more severe weather. we saw 30 reports of tornados yesterday. very unusual to see that during christmas day or even this late in the year. now we have another tornado watch. we're still seeing risk of tornados across eastern portions of state of north carolina and across portions of the state of south carolina. this tornado
of jet lag. >> we'll take you a week. >>> "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ >>> nation, i love new york city. the big apple, the city that never sleeps, rat zanadu. so i was crushed to learn the metropolis i know and love has changed. >> not one person was murdered in new york city on monday. nypd deputy commissioner paul brown couldn't even remember the last time a day went by where not one person was shot, stabbed, or slashed. >> what happened? i remember the real new york of the '80s. when in a single night you could score some weed, catch a time square porno and get stabbed in the neck by a coked up lou reid. and that was a pretty good first date. now time square has become a bubba gump wimp company. >>> good morning. it's tuesday. december 4th. welcome to "morning joe." with us onset, we have msnbc senior political analyst mark haleprin. oh, my god, please stop. just get it off. get it off -- >> pulitzer prize-winning historian jon meacham. "the art of power." >> so you know why i'm doing this. last night, mika goes to madison square garden thinking she's going to see one direction
revolt since mubarak was pushed out of power. "the new york times" also has another fascinating story. john boehner gained strong backing of the house gop. they actually say that the speaker's more powerful today than he has been since he became speaker two years ago. >> well, that's exactly the opposite of what we were discussing on the set yesterday with matt lewis. >> yeah. i guess one question is, is that story there for a purpose, which is to make him appear stronger, and also, is he strong in relation to the offer that's on the table, which is an offer that does not reflect compromise yet? >> well, he is strong, i think, as long as he's not seen as bowing down and caving in to the president. i will tell you, there are conservatives dair a s -- erick who is trying to get him removed as speaker, saying they only need 16 votes to drive john boehner out of time. >> that's kind of my point. >> a situation described as very fluid. >> how many degrees of freedom does he have from where he is now and who's holding the pen when they sign those letters? >> yeah, i don't think he's got a l
the world. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fall out of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more effective controls on the sale of guns. >> roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see in anyone should be able to purchase military style or body armor or weapons. >> let's start off. you are a big gun fan. pln to me why bob costas is wrong? >> it boils down to the ability to protect yourself piers. when you look at what is what happening in syria with the use of chemical weapons. somebody else has a threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner. you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or fi
to be here. as i tell my history students at the city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they want to choke me the past is a foreign country. we can visit, try to learn the customs and the white smith the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much in the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy as it is this time around. first there are people you have to talk to. and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of committees, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know they don't know at all. the difficulty is that it is not always easy to establish to construct the path that is so close to us and yet this is what historians have to do. our job i
to new york city. in new york, homer took a few lessons in painting from frederic rondel. rondel was a rather sentimental landscape painter who had little influence on homer's style beyond his technical instruction in the use of oils. when the civil war began, harper's commissioned the artist to depict life at the front. roving behind the lines with the potomac army, homer produced a series of closelybserved studies of camp life. homer's paintings of this period have an anecdotal or literary quality in keeping with the traditions of magazine illustration, but he also places new emphasis on pictorial design and the purely visual character of a scene-- qualities typical of the photographs of mathew brady and others. like the photographers of the civil war, whose equipment made action scenes impossible, homer preferred static group formations, and yet the feeling of directness in recording the ordinary lends to his work a special force. prisoners from the front, with its profound sense of the resignation, exhaustion, and human cost of war, evoked the admiration of both critics and t
with a group of u.s. hedge funds won't need to be heard in a u.s. court. the appeals division of the new york supreme court has ruled there isn't enough connection between those events and the new york state to justify the case being held there. the court ruling noted that germany's legal system would provide an adequate alternative. certainly not the last chapter in that saga. >> no. probably not the last saga in this, either. hewlett packard has suggested the u.s. is looking into questionable accounting practices. last month's ceo meg whitman used that as the basis for a nearly $9 billion write-down. the ex ceo mike lynch continues to defend the company's accounting practices. hewlett packard, a little higher in german trade this morning. but down by 20% of its value. >> not a pretty quarter for hewlett packard. >>> brent crude has climbed above the $100 a barrel mark as u.s. lawmakers attempt to avoid the fiscal cliff. but crude is poised to post its smallest gain in three years. wti is set to post its first annual last in four years. ian, welcome. we've seen this sharp decline in oil pric
austerity pross. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate abt whher e u.k should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall stree
dribbled in. they were rust buckets and virtually obsolete. which roosevelt told t"new york times" and congress. he said we gave them junk and we get six or seven caribbean naval bases from the empire. at one point that summer i believe churchill wrote a letter and asked roosevelt to declare war. that is how desperate he was. and so after a few brandies in t the co vilville diaries churchi says they want to us bleed to death and pick up everything that is left for free. at one point they were thinking around the dipper table of having everyone in england melt their wedding rings because it might raise $8 million or $10 million of gold and use that to buy american goods because it was all cash and carry, to shame the americans. they didn't do that. host: how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? guest: one of the things, in doing this, i had to lock at what is he interested in? what is in his head. try to place churchill in his tim times. he was interested in norway, sumatra, not japan, not the pacific. his knowledge of the geography, the politics, the milita
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city
good friend from rochester new york, the distinguished ranking minority member of the committee on rules, ms. slaughter. pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. dreier: all time will be yielded for debate purposes only. i would like to ask, mr. speaker, unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, i was just thinking about the fact that there are 26 letters in the alphabet, and we have had the first three letters used in discussion here on the house floor today. a, b, and my friend from worcester brought up the letter c in talking about this. we have what is so-called letter b. and i'm not doing a "sesame street" skit here. letter b is what we are talking about, plan b, and i think about plan a. plan a is what the majority in the house of representatives has been trying for the last two years to implement
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> we shall go on to the end. we shall fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an ex
've been investing for around 20 years, he says. compared to new york and london, investments in china are relatively new. the markets he said are dominated by small time chinese investors who bet more on gossip and behavior rather than company profit. trading halls here feel like gambling debs. people in trading rooms like this one with just wiling their time away. most of them are stereo scared to get back into the market. chinese investor res paralyzed by the worst economic growth since the 1990s. historically, the markets here have gone through booms and busts, but have never gained the stad temperature of the economy. now the world's second largest. the problem is, people don't trust what they're buying. that reality was exposed by a accounting scandals in the u.s., involving new york listed chinese companies currently under scrutiny by the securities and exchange economic oh sec. >> the chinese regulatory authority only do themselves a disfavor by not being more cooperative with other international regulators such as the s.e.c. and then investors back home here will pick up on th
before christmas. i'm carl, with melissa lee, david faber at the nyse. the new york stock exchange and nasdaq closing at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. the futures, a little bit of weakness here which we'll talk about in a minute, after it comes after a pretty bad day on friday. the european markets closed for the christmas eve holidays. london, paris, spain have each completed shortened sessions in light of the christmas holiday as well. the friday sell-off, only five trading days are left in the year. is the market getting used to the idea that a fiscal cliff solution will not happen before year end? >> only a few hours remain to finish your christmas shopping. but some words of caution for toymakers. are tablets and apps ruining the season as kids get more accustomed to technology? >> microsoft windows 8 gets more bad press today, as "the new york times" said it is not leading to a boost in pc sales. is there anything that can turn that lagging sector around? futures moving lower, as concerns about the fiscal cliff talks weigh on the market. talks about progress toward a deal sent the
'm melissa lee live from the new york stock exchange. negative across the board, looks like we're going to lose about 8.5% on the dow. we're watching for headlines out of an ecd press report. our road map this morning starting with apple, cratering on its biggest decline yesterday on four years, closing just pennies off the lows of the session. the stock continues lower premarket as investors watch the death cross watch. >> a cnbc exclusive, tim geithner says over the cliff is a must. >> bank of england and ecb keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >> apple as we mentioned in the spotlight today, shares of the tech giant coming off their worst day in four years, sliding back into bear market territory. the one day loss erased nearly $35 billion in market cap. that chunk is bigger than 400 other s&p 500 companies. apple ceo tim cook talked to nbc's brian williams in our rock center exclusive. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, th
about jefferson to give you two sides of him very quickly. matthew davis, an office seeker from new york goes to monticello to fit in the city even now, travels to lobby for the job, he was a burr loyalist. jefferson, not so much a loyalist as we know. i should quickly add one of these i say to my hamiltonian friends is at least my guy didn't get shot in jersey. [laughter] among the founders to have sent e-mails is alexander hamilton what thomas jefferson and one to get on the record and then move on if he's sitting there pleading his case and jefferson is looking sort of blow seng in that vaguely charming we had. he's not like fdr that you can leave. anyone that left his company thought he agreed with them. it's to get for the moment and not such a great way to get through the day as it turns out to he is my contact with davis and goes, grabs the fly it begins pulling apart. davis begins to realize that man of for quite as well as he hoped. a second story. there you have the man that can snap a fly, pulled apart and ferociously focused when he needs to be to read often making you thinki
corp. in new york or listen to don imus. he had a ted kennedy impersonator and sounded just like this. so i listened to the message and after listening to it the second and third time, i realized it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in session and they could roam and play in the senate. that's a weird site, believe me. we were brought into a tiny little conference room for two dogs, senator and me with the card table and the senator, who was always on the target. they believed he would feel better the center he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was end on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of red in potato chips. we talked for three, four hours. but i remember saying over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i'm an historian and i'm going to find stuff
bill clinton. >> i'm not american so i can't really tell, can i. >i. >> sean: can you do a new york accent? >> i'm not going to try. >> >> sean: how you doing. talk radio, coffee. >> coffee. >> how you doin. great to see you. thank you for being on the show. >> sean: sadly, that's all the time we have left this evening. as always, thank you for being with us. let not your heart be troubled. the news continues. we will see you back here on monday. >> greta: tonight is america getting weak? vice-president dick cheney slamming president obama's foreign policy. >> our allies no longer trust us or have confidence in us, and our adversaries no longer fear us. the president makes bold statements and bold talk in the last couple of days about developments in syria, but i don't think they care. >> greta: you'll hear more from vice-president cheney in a few minutes, but first, the big threat here at home. >> this isn't a progress report because there's no progress to report. >> tax cuts? not government spending, not irresponsible entitlements. that gets a pass. it will be tax cuts. obama's pr
responding to a fire in upstate new york. that happened early this morning not because of the fire they were trying to put out, but police in webster, new york say they were shot. three homes burned police say for hours gunshots stopped the firefighters from putting out the fires, forced police s.w.a.t. teams to evacuate the homes in the area. just in, police say the shooter who killed the two firefighters is also dead. they say he set a trap for those firefighters. >>> the nra is standing tough on its opposition to new gun laws in the aftermath of the killings in newtown, connecticut. the ceo went on "meet the press" to defend his call for armed guards in every american school, but here's what a couple of front pages said about wane laperriere. one called him a gun nut and another one headlined with the crazy heest man on earth. laperriere he is not backing down. watch. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i'll tell you what the american people -- i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. >
[applause] sandy. new york? to place it in a modern context, we have to turn to proxy data like coral and ice to piece together the puzzle of how the climate buried in the distant past. it showed it was relatively warm. it was about a thousand years ago. recently that exceeded anything we have seen. it was featured in the summary for policy makers in 2001. when it became an icon, those who find the science inconvenient saw the need to try to discredit this graph. they saw discrediting me as a way to do that. some have been attacked for the work they have done. i was also bill of five. my book tells the story of what it is like to be a scientist and find yourself in voluntary and accidental public figure. i was put in the limelight in limelight. [laughter] stick metaphor -- >> yes. that, if we as scientists are talking to the right people. reflag that we would not tell you but for fear that you might >> you are relatively new todid you know what you're getting a career in atmospheric change? having studied under steven the public scrutiny. 98%. the backlash. >> what happened? there was an incr
. >>> i'm don lemon with a look at your headlines. hillary clinton will spend new year's eve in a new york city hospital with a blood clot. doctors admitted the secretary of state sunday after a medical exam. the clot is believed to be related to the concussion she suffered earlier this month. when she fainted from the effects of a stomach virus. doctors want to keep her and a close eye on her for 48 hours. the other big story tonight is the action or inaction on capitol hill. if lawmakers do not reach a fiscal cliff agreement, you could see your taxes skyrocket and deep spending cuts kick in on entitlements and tax increases. the major sticking points or entitlements and tax increases. house republicans met into the evening and we'll find out in the morning whether joe biden and mitch mcconnell made any progress in their talks. both houses will be back in session tomorrow. those are your headlines this hour, i'm don lemon, keeping you informed. cnn, the most trusted name in news. >>> three, two, one. and liftoff -- >> may 2012, space-x launched a rocket into space, becoming the first comm
headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york, and a woman thought this was really cute, and she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsey, and got a start on my political career making the case against the opponent as well. she gave me a white box with strings that looked to be pastries, and we opened it up, and there were all of these doughnuts in a wad of $10 bills. my first lesson in politics, the district leaders said you could keep the doughnuts. >> and david axelrod tonight, 8:0 p.m., -- 8:00 p.m. with -- on c-span. >> as president obama begins his second term in office, what is the most important issue he should consider? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, made a short video. >> it is your chance to win a grand prize of $5,000. $50,000 in total prize is. for more information, go to student cam.corg -- .prg. first lady michelle obama and chefs how the demonstration at the white house dining room. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> are you excited? very nice
you see this "new york times" piece? more support for boehner now than anytime in his speaker ship. is that's setting up for -- >> but it is social media and twitter allows to you see these things. >> sausage factory into the front of the kitchen. >> exactly. >> geithner didn't use the word marginal rates had to go up, just said rates. >> rates are already going up. there will be a tax increase to people making more than 250 anyway because of the health care law. so the idea that somehow they will get a freebie is just crazy. >> california at 52%, new york and other places -- >> when you add up all the state and local taxes. hawaii is above 50, as well. >> hawaii is worth it, though. >> california is not bad either. >> unless you need to drive somewhere. right? and don't have a helicopter. >> there's a reason the president takes a helicopter anywhere. you can't drive in d.c. sdl those a >> boston in the city can get like that. last night i was thinking in my mother was still alive, cincinnati versus here, she would see like ten cars an and go oh, i can't believe people -- if she ha
is stop reading the new york times. [laughter] much more than it used 210 or even -- >> my commentary. >> there is a sort of classic effort to say what is important and what is unimportant in accordance with an ideological schemes. you know, i don't think there's an answer to this, and it's very hard to get people to jump out of that sort of in the case of the times to liberal left, the view of the world. except over a long amount of time by pointing out to cognitive dissidence and disrupted -- discrepancies. i guess it's easier now in the sense that the state department, i remember work stopped at 630 to watch cronkite and broke off. their interpretation of the news was critical for the u.s. government. likewise, time and newsweek. i mean, you now have -- pardon me. you now have many more news broadcasts and we have the internet. so if we could just get rid of the new york times, the problem would be about 25 percent salt. i actually am serious about that because of its influence on media elites throughout the country who look at it to determine how to understand the world. >> please
in america, states like new york, california, connecticut could point out they in effect subsidize states like alabama, mississippi, montana, states ironically the most fervent advocates of state rights and small government. >>> up next, we'll take you into the heart of darkness, one of africa's most troubled nations has taken a turn for the worse. back in a moment. who do you think i am, quicken loans? at quicken loans, we'll provide you with myql mobile. this amazingly useful app allows you to take pictures of your mortgage documents using an iphone or android smart phone... so you can easily send them to us. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ooh, la-la! one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for mo
convict in new york state has killed two firemen, apparently loring the firefighters by starting a blaze. a body found at his home is believed to be that of his sister. >> police investigating the murder say the man was in possession of several weapons. >> the convicted felon is thought to have set his own home on fire on christmas eve. when firefighters responded, he allegedly shot them. police fired back. >> got to be a rifle or a shotgun, high-powered. >> two firefighters died, and two were seriously injured in the combat-style ambush. investigators found a typed message. >> "i still have to get ready to see how much of the neighborhood i can burn down and do what i like doing best -- killing people." >> the shooting comes amid a renewed debate in the u.s. over gun ownership rights and just 10 days after a school shooting rampage in connecticut. as has happened after other recent shooting sprees, sales of assault-style rifles have seen a spike in gun shops since the massacre. many buyers seem to fear the weapons will be banned and want to get one legally before hand. >> ceremonies hav
house would be burn down. the tea boycott spread to other cities, down the coast to new york, philadelphia, charleston, and other ports. this was the original tea party movement. it was not patriotic. it was not pretty or glorious. the furry climaxed thursday, december 16th, 1773, just before kris christmas, and the dumping of a million dollars worth of british tea. the people who dumped them amounted to about six or seven dozen men, nobody knows exactly how many were there. it was dark. many disguised themselves as indians. ironically, the white colonist who slaughtered indians on site, disguised themselves as indians baa they regarded them as a symbol of freedom. this unleashed a social, political, and economic upheaval they would never again be able to control. the tea party provoked a reign of terror in boston and other american cities with american inflicting unimaginable bar bareties on each other. they dumped ships, boston staged a second tea party a few months after the first one. the mobs showed no dissent, burning homes of anyone they suspected of favoring british r
these negotiations. >> i've had conversations with people in new york and working on trade floors. what i've been told by them is there is a huge number of meetings going on around closed doors avoiding all cameras. there has to be a solution. both parties would be blamed if they didn't have a solution. so we know there's going to away solution. it's just what solution is it going to be? >> is it fair to say a grand bargain is off the table? >> or maybe a solution for a few months just to keep it going pap complete collapse is not acceptable. it's not an option. but maybe prolonging this for another three or four months and maybe having longer discussions about it may be the only solution they can come to. >> we're talking about how taxes could potentially go up for 98% of americans. is it going to be an issue of if and when that happens, if they don't reach even a short-term solution, that you really feel it at that point? >> because we have seen alg bit of a recovery in the u.s., up until this point. and people have been feeling more positive. but if you look at the retail numbers and you look
, obviously, to a new york times reporter who didn't describe this as movement of the chemical weapons. what makes it different this time was it was described as the syrians taking steps in preparation for use. that's far more serious and far more concerning to american and regional officials if syria is undertaking activity that looks like the preparation for the deployment of these chemical weapons. remember, you mentioned, brooke, turkey. also jordan. we have -- there are regional allies and neighbors there who would be directly threatened. and, of course, the syrian foreign minister, while not acknowledging that syria has chemical weapons, we know that to be a fact, said they wouldn't use -- syria wouldn't use it against its own people. it did not rule out using it against its regional neighbors. the secretary of state clinton made quite clear that this would be crossing a red line for the united states. >> you know, i was reading an article, fran, daily beast this morning talking about they called it al qaeda 3.0. and they point out that the long they are bloody civil war continues in s
. the next story, i believe, is going to be a four-inch snowfall for new york city on saturday. now, how does it get from memphis essentially up to new york city? well, it's going to take some time. it's going to drive right up and down this ohio valley with rain showers to the south and significant snows. two to four inches all the way along the border here. i would say parts of missouri, indiana, illinois, evansville, cincinnati, columbus back into pennsylvania. we'll get to that in the next hour. alina. >> that's a lot of places, chad myers. all right, chad, thanks so much. >>> i'm alina cho. thanks so much for watching. have a great weekend and a great new year's. "cnn newsroom" with my friend suzanne malveaux starts right now. >>> i'm suzanne malveaux. welcome to our 500th edition of our show. we've got a lot to cover so let's get right to it. russia dominating our newscast this hour. for two very different reasons. first, the man, that man you see there, russia's top diplomat, he is now taking an active role in trying to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china h
for us in zurich. how will this pan out, carolyn? >> well, this is all based on reports in the "new york times" that came out overnight, ross. and the most interesting piece of information in that report at least i think is the fact that the fine for ubs in connection with the libor investigation could be higher than that that was given to barclays in the summer. remember, barclays paid $450 million to settle that libor probe. and at the time that was a record fine. so now the new york teams is talking about a fine that could be even higher than that. ubs in zurich told me they have no further comment beyond the fact that they have been fully cooperating with regulatory and enforcement authorities in this libor investigation. so we didn't get any confirmation from ubs whatsoever. but the "new york times" does report that u.s. officials are hoping to complete the settlement with ubs maybe mid-december, but of course there could always be delays.is scant, but ubs is probably looking at a very hefty fine and shares in zurich this morning are underperforming the broader market, flat versus t
. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks do
and went on to study elsewhere. she debuted at the metropolitan opera house in new york in 1995. she has performed on four continents and song with all the greats in the industry. "the new york times" said this. "she has a classic voice with a wide range. from her low voice to her top notes, she is a compelling stage actress. if anything, she underestimates her charisma." the critic noted that his favorite moment was after her arrest, sitting on a table with her hands tied behind her back, she slowly lifted her skirt above her knees with her teeth. he wrote that from that moment, she had the audience enthralled. thank you both for being here. >> i have just had knee surgery. we were at the kennedy center honors. my husband said it will be difficult to lift your skirt with your teeth. >> i want to start with a question for both of you. was there one person who was your mentor role model and inspired you to be where you are now? >> i started off in the magazine industry. i cannot say i had a mentor early on. the person who inspired me most is probably clay falker. he started "new york" mag
with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was hosted by the forth sity's john dan center. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale
already paid to new york state regulators in the third quarter. but despite that, q4 earnings will still ygrow in the mid single digit range. presumably actually clarity on fines is good. >> it brings closure. several thinking it could be several multiplmultiples. so improved visibility on that is definitely a positive. >> and here is city saying they're cut 1g 1,000 jobs. standard chartered is talking about hiring another 2,000 jobs. and if they get an increase in earnings, another record year. >> they're extremely well positioned. they're in the sweet spot of the global economy, where thes fastest growth is to some extent. asia, indonesia, africa. they have a very strong balance sheet. so they're in the position to really gain market share even in the context of a slightly slowing macro picture. but interestingly since the third quarter ims, we heard today from standard chartered again and they were quite upbeat particularly for the likes of singapore and i sandia and so forth. so outlook for revenue is actually quite positive and it's on quite a low multiple and could easily rerate to
. it was a film about death and the civil war. i went with the filmmaker, ken burns, to antietam, new york, washington. people want to talk about these ideas. there is a huge appetite for what is war? how do we understand this? i felt this was an example vacation for me as to what the humanities can be and do. i embrace what you say. i worry about the decline in humanity concentrators even in institutions like ours. there are some places where the humanities are expendable when we have to constrained resources. i think we do ourselves a terrible disservice as a country. it does not focus on how to get where it needs to go but knows where it ought to be going. that is a fundamental obligation. >> a great ending to a great panel. thank you. [applause] i'm now going to invite al hunt to come up and introduces panel. in the last session i said gene sperling would be joining us after this discussion. he was in the midst of the fiscal cliff negotiations, so hopefully he will tell us how he is protecting these important investments. >> next, a conversation about spurring investment in the marketp
mary, daughter of railroad tycoon eh harriman, who headed the eugenics record office in new york, saying quote, the pfizer team is going to be a purifying conflagration one day, unquote. his prophecy would come true only 20 years later at a cost of millions. fairly easy for governments to manipulate public health, medicines and doctors for purposes of quote family planning. this soon led into policies about colonial possessions and citizenship. peoples of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not fit the progress is a view of educated elite. and by their definitions, were close to quote life unworthy of life, unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony of this time, american movies followed a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism. god, fair play, and they avoided sensationalism, sexual situations and other taboo vices. american movies sold ame
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